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Employee Engagement Saskatchewan Style

Coming back to Saskatchewan

(Reading and viewing time = 2 minutes, 30 seconds)

Flag of Saskatchewan

I look forward to returning home to Saskatchewan near the end of April to conduct two sessions on engagement  in both Regina and Saskatoon. There is a lunch session on employee engagement and an afternoon session on engaged well being. I am doing this in conjunction with the Saskatchewan Association of Human Resource Professionals (SAHRP). I will be in Regina on Monday April 28th  and Saskatoon on Tuesday April 29th. Here is a 1 minute 42 second invite/introduction to what we will focus on. I look forward to you joining me.

David Zinger Engage SK from David Zinger on Vimeo.

David Zinger is an employee engagement speaker and expert who was born in Regina, lived in Saskatoon, and never stopped being a Saskatchewan Roughriders fan.

Employee Engagement Through People Artistry

A People Artistry Tidbit

(Reading time: 50 seconds )

Peoplt Artistry at Work Book Cover

I had a wonderful conversation with the latest reader of People Artistry at Work. He just retired this year as the Assistant Superintendent of a very large school division. He believed the book was a fine leadership book and that it summed up his approach to successful leadership.

He stated, “it is amazing what we can accomplish and achieve together when we recognize and value people even if they initially lack skills.” Through our people artistry we empower, we build capacity and as leaders we never lose sight of the fact that we are only as good as the people we lead. We need to recognize all employees so they recognize their own strengths, gifts, challenges, and contributions.

To learn more about this $10 book or to order people artistry for all you leaders visit: www.peopleartistry.com.

David Zinger is an employee engagement speaker and expert.

Making the real definition of employee engagement more real

Making it real

(Reading time: 1 minute)

Real Zing Box

When I wrote the original definition of real employee engagement, I was wrong. I usually am wrong about 50% of the time but being wrong promotes learning and revisions so being open to being wrong feels quite right to me.

I recently wrote the real definition of employee engagement:

Good work, done well, with others, on a daily basis.

I loved the down-to-earth elegant simplicity of the definition but I forgot something. Supposedly Albert Einstein said, make things as simple as possible but no simpler. I think I was too simple with the first definition. I had neglected the first principle of my 10 principles of engagement, first composed in January of 2008 and revised  in 2010. The first principle stated:

Employee engagement is specific. We cannot sustain engagement all the time and everywhere. When we talk about engagement we need to ask: Who is engaged, with what,  for how long, and for what purpose?

I now believe the new real definition of employee engagement must add:

Good work, done well, with others, on a daily basis to …

You need to complete the “to …” What result is it that you seek from engagement? This could range from safety and wellbeing to profits, cost reductions, or lean processes. Ensure your engagement work has a direction.

For example, I was working with a group on employee engagement and customer experience. As I thought about the real definition of engagement for their purposes, I added:

Good work, done well, with others, on a daily basis to enrich the customer and employee experience.

This definition offered focus and direction to engagement and offered a specific purpose to the engagement work.

David Zinger is an employee engagement speaker and expert on his way to a better way of working with work.

A review of Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown

(Reading time: 58 seconds)

Essentialism

I enjoyed Greg McKeown’s new book on Essentialism.  To be effective with the small, simple, significant, and sustainable approach to employee engagement we must focus our efforts and time on the essentials.

McKeown had a lot of fine points including the discernment and the unimportance of practically everything. His four E’s of essentialism encompass: essence, explore, eliminate, and execute. The essentialist start small and gets big results while celebrating small acts of progress. Are you doing that with your employee engagement programs and initiatives?

Here is a quotation from the book on only doing what is essential:

Essentialism is not about how to get more things done; it’s about how to get the right things done. It doesn’t mean just doing less for the sake of less either. It is about making the wisest possible investment of your time and energy in order to operate at our highest point of contribution by doing only what is essential.

My quibble with this book on essentialism was the length of about 250 pages. I believe our books on engagement need to be more essential while also being briefer. I encourage you to read the book but only focus on the essential sections!

David Zinger is an employee engagement speaker and expert who encourages all of us involved in employee engagement to be more essential in how we focus on engagement and how we work.

Is Employee Engagement a Threat or a Thread?

Are we creating iatrogenic disengagement?

(Reading time 1 minute, 20 seconds)

OneBall_Pause

Employee engagement may threaten the established ways of working when we fully engage employees and stop stifling  voice, identity, and innovation. I believe the fresher ways of working produce both fear and threat for many leaders and managers. I think conducting anonymous surveys suggest that engagement is seen as a threat in the organization. I have always believed that disengagement should not be a punishable offense but rather a trigger for a conversation about work. How can it trigger a conversation if we don’t know who is saying what?  If leaders and managers really don’t know who is saying what and have to rely on a survey to get some aggregate data I think they need to be more engaged with employees.

It seems to me engagement must be threatening if the only way we believe employees will tell us the truth is if we make their responses anonymous – - – yet being anonymous inside an organization is certainly one of the contributors to feeling disengaged from the organization.  In medicine this is termed iatrogenesis – the illness is caused by the treatment. I think in many circumstance, our anonymous surveys are causing iatrogenic disengagement.

Engagement can be a thread that sews work, management, and leadership together. It changes how we work as we operate more from invitation, connection, conversation, trust, value-congruence, etc. So let’s take the thread of engagement and use it to stitch together the open wounds of threat in our organizations and work together so work will work for everyone. If we do this, I sincerely believe work can be healing and make us well.

David Zinger is an employee engagement speaker and expert who firmly believe that for work to be sustainable it must make us well.

People Artistry at Work Begins to Make Its Way Around the World

My friends at Deed send out a tweet and picture of People Artistry at Work:

People Artistry at Work: The Ennoblement Imperative

New Book: People Artistry at Work: The Ennoblement Imperative (50 pages)

Peoplt Artistry at Work Book Cover

We are not advocating for the nobility of entitlement or title but rather the nobility of people working together with a deepening of the authentic artistry that is possible in all work and relationships. ~ The opening line from People Artistry at Work: The Ennoblement Imperative  by Peter W. Hart and David Zinger

I am pleased to offer you this slim and  beautiful 50 page high quality book to improve recognition and engagement where you work. The book is printed on high quality glossy paper and is rich with beautiful illustrations. Yet, the true beauty of this book is to draw our your People Artistry at work to bring out the best in your people and your organization. Most readers have already requested bulk orders to get everyone in their organization on the same page with recognition and engagement!

People Artistry was co-authored with Peter W. Hart from Rideau Recognition and the paintings we used to illustrate the book are all originals from Peter.

Here are the 10 practices from the book:

  1. Gift
  2. See
  3. Inspire
  4. Give
  5. Dance
  6. Ensure
  7. Evolve
  8. Learn
  9. Capture
  10. Practice

To open a one page PDF owner’s guide for the book click on the following link: People Artistry an Owner’s Guide.

Early readers told us this is more than a book on recognition and engagement, it is a gift. They went beyond reading the book to buying copies for other leaders, managers, supervisors, and employees at work. It is a tremendous value at $9.95 and includes a beautiful envelope if we mail it to you or if you want to give it to others as a gift. If you order multiple copies we will send you multiple envelopes, just ensure you email me directly for bulk orders.

Chris Bailey sent us a picture when he received the book a few weeks ago saying “It’s cold outside but this book is warming my soul. Love it. Thanks David Zinger.” He added “As soon as I start at my next organization, I’m buying copies for all my staff.”

People Artistry Comment from Chris Bailey

For more information or to order multiple copies as a gift of recognition where you workContact David Zinger at david@davidzinger.com.

The price is in Canadian dollars and includes all shipping, handling, and taxes (ensure you use the arrow on the PayPal price link below to get the right price category for your location:

  • Canada  $16.00
  • United States $18.00
  • International $20.00

Book/Shipping/Taxes